2013,  benefits,  books and reading,  C-A-B,  campaigns,  courage,  disability,  Uncategorized

For the love of a book

I love to read. This comes as no surprise to anyone who knows me or who reads this blog regularly I’m sure.

There’s just something about picking up a book and losing yourself in it. It makes me think, I learn stuff, it’s enjoyable. They make me laugh, cry and just feel. Sometimes I reach for a book as pure escapism and it also means as long as I’ve got a book or my kindle in my bag I can fill a few minutes waiting at the hairdressers or the doctors really easily and it makes the wait less annoying.

According to statistics 1 in 6 adults of working age in the UK find reading difficult or impossible. Quick Reads is a charity dedicated to improving literacy. They aim to show that books and reading can be for everyone. Each year they commission big name authors to write short books that are specifically designed to be easy to read. They are the same as mainstream books in every respect but are simply shorter and easier to tackle for adults who are less confident in their reading skills. The books are then sold through major retailers, online booksellers and are loaned from libraries. They are also very low priced – usually £1 – which makes them even more accessible.

I can’t imagine not being able to read. I just can’t.

Books are such a huge part of my life and so is writing. I don’t know what it would be without it. But the thing is the ability to read is about so much more that books. It’s about being able to read directions to places you need to go. How much and how often to take the paracetamol you just picked up. instructions for your new oven or even how long to cook that pizza.

If you can’t read and you get an official letter what do you do about it? At CAB often I see clients that need to check what a letter means or what to do with a form they’ve been sent. Some of the time it’s because it wasn’t written in plain English and they need jargon translating. We’ve all had letters like that where we think “I know what it says but I don’t know what it means”. Letters from the DWP are a frequent example. But often people who come in with a letter only have a vague idea what it’s about because of their literacy level or haven’t been able to read it at all.

Letters about benefits are very distinctive. They come in a brown envelope and the typeface peeking through the window of it is this one particular one that to me and I’m sure many others screams DWP. And “Doom!” to some. I know a letter is about benefits before I open it and as I’m currently awaiting an ESA decision I appropriate all brown envelopes with some apprehension and ones obviously from the DWP with more.

But I can read. I can open that letter and know what it says with as little or as much delay as I choose. Many people can’t. I can’t imagine what the fear of that letter would be like it if was multiplied by the time it took to find a friend or relative who could read it or to get to a CAB or similar that was able to help. I know an inability to read fluently has meant deadlines and appointments missed to some people – and potentially worse.

So when Quick Reads told me about their six new books for 2013 and asked if I’d like copies and to help promote their literacy work I of course said yes! I’d read a few before and knew they were very enjoyable and was intrigued to see what they had this year.

The six books are:
A Dreadful Murder by Minette Walters
A Sea Change by Veronica Henry
Doctor Who – The Silurian Gift by Mike Tucker
Love is Blind by Kathy Lette
Today Everything Changes by Andy McNab
Wrong Time, Wrong Place by Simon Kernick

I’ve been reading some of the books over the last few days and I’ll be posted a review or two later today.

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