2014,  Book A Day,  books and reading,  CP related,  Uncategorized

Should have sold more copies

As I wrote on one of the earlier prompts I can’t help thinking this “Should have sold more copies” prompt is a bit samey with two of the prompts that have already been done. See here.

I don’t keep track of the number of copies that a book sells.  I might have a good idea of how popular something is because of reading stuff online, particularly on twitter, blogs and goodreads (facebook, less so) but numbers no I don’t.  No idea either of what sort of numbers sold would be considered below average, normal, good, outstanding etc.  I might google that because now I think of it I’m intrigued.  But at the same time I probably won’t because I doubt I’d find a straight answer.

So I can’t really list a book that should have sold more copies most because I don’t know how many copies it sold etc etc.

But let’s go with Don’t Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back by Harilyn Rousso.  I read that maybe six weeks ago and I’ve been meaning to blog about it in combination with a couple of other disability memoirs but I’ve not read the last one yet so I’ve not got round to writing that blog.  Maybe I’ll write it when I have, maybe I won’t.

Visual description: The cover of Don't Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back by Harilyn Rousso.  It features a head and shoulders self portrait of Harilyn Rousso with a blue background.
Visual description: The cover of Don’t Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back by Harilyn Rousso. It features a head and shoulders self portrait of Harilyn Rousso with a blue background.

Harilyn Rousso is an American woman with CP (I think she’s in her sixties?) and this is her memoir.

I liked it a lot and felt like I could relate to a lot of what she wrote about.  We had similar experiences in some ways and very different ones in others.  Part of that will be because Harilyn has a greater level of mobility than I do but the rest will just relate to simply being different people.

The book is a series of short essays I think is the best term on various aspects of disability and Harilyn’s life.  I found them all interesting and unlike other essay type books I didn’t find them rushed or feeling like a topic wasn’t covered in as much depth as I’d have like.  This might be because all of the essays are by the same person.

Some of the work she has done and projects she’s been involved with sound brilliant and I wished I could have been involved in something similar.  It was interesting to see the disability movement grow thoughout the situations she discussed.  She also did some work with young disabled teens and this is something I’ve always thought I could have benefited from and most of all that I’d like to do now.

I’d really recommend this book to any disabled person because it brings a real feeling of reading about someone like me and I liked that.  But it’s also a good book for parents or carers of disabled people to read or really anyone at all.  As long as they approach it with an open mind.

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