customer service,  disability rights,  discrimination,  powerchair,  safety,  trains

A Trip to Paddington

Last week I wrote about how place are Allegedly Accessible but so often aren’t. About ending up with memories of events that aren’t of the good time I had and the things we laughed about but of things being unexpectedly inaccessible and the pain and struggle that causes.

I went to London on Monday. I’m worried that it’s going to be another thing that in years to come my memories are of someone lying to my face and the fear and panic that caused, rather than the fun that came before. I’m angry about what happened. I’m very sad about how my brilliant day ended and being left with those memories to cloud the fun ones.

I’ve been trying to write about what happened but it turns out I said it all when I ranted on Facebook yesterday. So I will just copy and paste that and add a couple of bits in

My friend Carrie and I went to the V&A on Monday. We got the train to Paddington. I’m really not confident in that area of London (I go into Waterloo usually) and hadn’t felt I could do it by myself. But as we walked back to Paddington I thought I could do this by myself. I even thought I might try going via Oxford to London Marylebone which is an area I don’t know at all.

Then the assisted travel guy wouldn’t listen to me when I said I thought it was better for me to go in the other wheelchair space and he and a colleague we also asked both lied when we tried to insist and said it was the only wheelchair space. Then there was announcement that coaches 9-12 would detatch at Reading. But I was already on the train. In what was announced as the train pulled out as coach 11. Panic.

Twitter to the rescue and a man with a ramp came at Reading, took me off the train walked me past the second wheelchair space in coach 7 to the one in coach 3. Because he was happy to put me at the front like I wanted. Telling me as he did so that Paddington do this all the time. He also said “they don’t care because once you’re on the train you’re someone else’s problem”.

And one of the guys I’ve known for years met me at Didcot, commenting about Paddington and telling me that they’d got a message to Reading as soon as Paddington confirmed where I was.

I always thank the assisted travel team but I made sure to tell the final one how much I appreciate how good they are at Didcot and how I always feel safe when I know it’s him (when the staff put me on the train they often tell me who will be around when I return).

I wish I could say the same about Paddington. I don’t know if I will go there again or not.

[NOTE: I will be complaining and am sending details of my experience on Monday to at least one professional who is collecting assisted travel experiences.]

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