• 2019

    A Day at Wimbledon

    Last Tuesday my friend Carrie and I went to Wimbledon. She goes almost every year and queues for tickets but it was the first time I had been. I wasn’t sure about queuing so I entered the ballot and I heard about two weeks before that some tickets had been returned and redrawn and I had them. The tickets were for the Ladies Quarter Finals and were for Centre Court. To be completely honest I’m not really interested in tennis. I am, however, interested in disability sport and really had wanted to go to Wimbledon to see the wheelchair tournament. But when you enter the ballot you can’t specify what…

  • 2019,  attitudes,  CP related,  lymphoedema,  things people say

    Realistic

    I’ve been thinking a lot over the last week or so about how having a chronic condition or disability shapes your thinking and how this can be taken by those who don’t have the same experience (this is a topic I thought I’d written about follow a similar incident back in 2017 but I can’t find a blog. Which suggests it may have been a social media rant and lost to the abyss). When I went to lymphoedema clinic recently my legs were still the same size as when I was last seen in clinic in March. And the specialist nurse I see told me that she thinks it’s likely…

  • 2019,  books and reading,  reviews

    Critical by Dr Matt Morgan

    I’ve been feeling the need to expand my reading horizons lately so I read Critical: Science and stories from the brink of human life by Dr Matt Morgan. I received a review copy via NetGalley. Here is the synopsis: Being critically ill means one or more of your vital organs have failed – this could be your lungs, your heart, your kidneys, gut or even your brain. Starting with the first recognised case in which a little girl was saved by intensive care in 1952 in Copenhagen, Matt writes brilliantly about the fascinating history, practices and technology in this newest of all the major medical specialties. Matt guides us around…